Swarm for privacy nerds

Privacy is becoming one of the most discussed topics especially with the GDPR looking around the corner this year.

During my work I’m doing at Ambassify around setting up a framework for handling information security and privacy I stumbled upon an interesting privacy issue.

Your OS stores a list of previously connected WiFi hotspots on your computer for convinience so you can auto reconnect when you visit the same location a second time. The problem with this is that each WiFi hotspot name, also called the SSID, is potentially unique.

These semi unique SSIDs in combination with a wardrive database like Wiggle would make it possible for us to query each SSID in the computers hotspot history and plot the resulting coordinates on a map to get an idea which locations a certain user has visited.

Proof of Concept

The following proof of concept is for Mac but I’m sure the same thing will be possible on other OS’es

# get list of previously connected hotspots
ap=$(defaults read /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/com.apple.airport.preferences | grep SSIDString | sed -E 's/SSIDString = ?(.*);/\1/' | xargs -n1 | sort -u)
echo $ap

for name in $ap; do

    # fetch hotspot info from Wigle API
    result=$(curl -s -H 'Accept:application/json' -u [credentials] --basic "https://api.wigle.net/api/v2/network/search?ssid="$name)

    # extract coordinates
    long=$(echo $result | python -c "import sys, json; print json.load(sys.stdin)['results'][0]['trilong']")
    lat=$(echo $result | python -c "import sys, json; print json.load(sys.stdin)['results'][0]['trilat']")
    echo "[$lat, $long, '$name'],"
done

When you drop the output that this script generates into this Google Maps example you get a visual map of potential locations I, or atleast my laptop, have been.

Example wifi hotspot location plot

Note that this map above was only generated from a subset of my total history. My complete history contained more than 350 access points.

Conclusion

The point that I want to make with this PoC is: lookout what data you share. It’s not because certain data is not senitive at this moment that it can’t be in a few years or when combined with some other datasets.

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Published on May 07, 2017